Seeva

Seeva

Jere (left) and Diane Lansinger are the father-daughter co-founders of Seeva, a Seattle-based mobility startup. The company announced this summer that it struck a 10-year agreement to supply its proprietary washer fluid heating system to a snowplow fleet operated by New York's Department of Transportation. Seeva has also added Geoff Deane, former vice president of Intellectual Ventures, as its chief technology officer, and in February, the company raised a $2 million seed round led by Trucks Venture Capital.

Photo courtesy of Seeva.

Cargo

Cargo

Cargo is a New York-based startup with an app that allows rideshare drivers to operate a mobile convenience store via an in-car box of snacks. The company has raised a total of $30 million, including a $22 million Series A round led by Founders Fund. It also notched its millionth rider earlier this year.

Photo courtesy of Cargo.

SPLT

SPLT

Detroit-based ridesharing company SPLT provides carpooling services to corporations, municipalities, and universities. Its algorithm matches people who share the same route to school or work, and then computes the fastest way to get there. In February, SPLT was acquired by Bosch for an undisclosed amount. At the time, CEO Anya Babbitt said SPLT had roughly 140,000 users and 20 corporate customers in the United States, Mexico, and Germany.

Photo courtesy of SPLT.

Spatial

Spatial

Cincinnati-based Spatial uses location and social media data to develop “personality profiles” of neighborhoods and local points of interest. Earlier this year, the company inked a deal with Ford Smart Mobility to power the city-sensing software on the automaker's City of Tomorrow platform.

Photo courtesy of Spatial.

GoKid

GoKid

GoKid is an invitation-based carpooling app that allows families, schools, and sports teams to set up and manage carpools with people they trust. The company is backed by Village Capital, Jaguar Land Rover's venture arm, Deutsche Bahn Digital Ventures, and others. More than 140,000 carpool rides have been arranged through the app, and GoKid says it has users in 650 cities and 25 countries.

Photo courtesy of GoKid.

Voyhoy

Voyhoy

Voyhoy, with offices in Miami and Chile, is a multimodal travel platform in Latin America helping people compare prices and buy tickets from more than 1,000 providers operating over 100,000 routes in Chile, Argentina, Peru, Brazil, and Colombia. In 2017, Chile's Corporation for the Promotion of Production invested 60 million pesos in the company. Other backers of the company include Fontinalis Partners, 1776, Outbound Ventures, and Autonebula.

Photo courtesy of Voyhoy.

HAAS Alert

HAAS Alert

HAAS Alert is a software system that allows first responders and other municipal entities to send real-time notifications to drivers about road conditions and other driver-safety issues. It does this by enabling drivers to use their smartphones as telematics devices. The company has announced partnerships with Ford and Jaguar Land Rover, and in 2016, HAAS Alert was named one of the top 10 automotive startups by Fortune magazine. It was also named a GovTech 100 company earlier this year.

Photo courtesy of HAAS Alert.

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for safety and submit the info to the app, creating a comprehensive map that notes short cuts and provides real-time alerts for lane closures, potholes, and other hazards.

Founder Lynsie Campbell says the platform currently has about 30,000 bikers that have submitted more than 55,000 pieces of safety information. “Our secret sauce isn’t an algorithm, but a passionate, engaged community,” she adds. At the moment, LaneSpotter covers 22 cities across America.

Lumos (Hong Kong): Speaking of bikes, cyclists sometimes worry that the dinky lights mounted on their handlebars won’t be enough to alert drivers to their presence and intentions. Enter Lumos, which makes a smart bike helmet with a small bank of LED lights, displaying turn signals and brake signals. Lumos products can be found at more than 300 Apple stores around the world, the company says.

Priva (Chicago): Short flights for regional business travel are expensive and a hassle, the company maintains. So Priva offers WiFi-enabled luxury vehicles to provide door-to-door service for small groups of business travelers. “It’s optimized for teams to collaborate and engage,” says Dagan Mishoulam, co-founder and CEO. In the future, the company will look at a “hotel on wheels” service for overnight trips, and one that travels to different destinations in the same city, he adds.

Priva is currently beta testing in Detroit and Chicago, but plans to expand to other cities soon.

SkyHi (San Francisco): SkyHi is a subscription service for booking last-minute flights. Members pay $199 per month to access five flat-rate, one-way flights. Travelers going to a destination up to 1,000 miles away pay an additional $35 for a ticket, $75 for a flight between 1,000 and 2,000 miles away, and $120 for a flight that is 2,000 to 3,000 miles away. (For example, a New Yorker would pay $35 to fly to Chicago, $75 to fly to Denver, and $120 to fly to Los Angeles.)

Zohr (Kansas City, MO): The process of buying and installing new tires can eat the better part of a Saturday afternoon, but Zohr believes it doesn’t have to be that way. The company sells tires online and then delivers and installs them. “It’s a tire shop that comes to you,” explains founder and CEO Komal Choong. “It’s similar to Safelite, except it’s tires. The industry is behind the times, and that’s one reason we started the company.”

Zohr’s customers can go to the company’s website, choose the tires they want according to the make and model of their vehicles, and Zohr will deliver and install them on-site at the customer’s location—usually within two hours, Choong says. Right now, the service is only available in Kansas City, but he says a Detroit expansion may be coming soon.

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