New investors

New investors

Artaic recently raised a $2.1 million funding round from Lesso and InTeahouse. Pictured left to right: Michael Mai of Lesso America, Xin Liu of InTeahouse, and Ted Acworth of Artaic.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

New digs

New digs

Artaic recently moved into the Boston Design Center, home to showrooms for a variety of luxury interior furnishings.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Fashion forward

Fashion forward

A mannequin adorned with a mosaic skirt greets visitors in Artaic's mosaic-filled lobby.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Colorful hallway

Colorful hallway

Here's a glimpse of the types of art pieces Artaic can produce for customers.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Close-up

Close-up

The mosaics are formed by assembling small colored pieces of glass, stone, ceramic, or other materials into rows that form a larger image or pattern.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Classy lighting

Classy lighting

Mosaics aren't just for walls.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Design

Design

Artaic developed computer-aided design software that can translate virtually any image into specifications for the placement of tiles in a mosaic.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Inventory

Inventory

A bucket of tiny pieces of vitreous glass await their chance to get placed in a mosaic.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Human-robot collaboration

Human-robot collaboration

Dave Leva, an Artaic production assistant, leans over the company's robot, Arty, to make sure everything is set up correctly before he starts up the robot.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Assembly time

Assembly time

A high-speed robotic arm handles the manual labor of picking and placing tiles, at a rate of nearly two tiles per second.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Hard at work

Hard at work

The tiles get assembled in one-square-foot sheets.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Quality control

Quality control

Evel Almonte, an Artaic production assistant, checks to make sure the product matches the digital rendering.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

Final product

Final product

The sheets of tile are shipped to customers and assembled into the full mosaic on site.

Photo by Tim Correira Photography, courtesy of Artaic.

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sales and marketing efforts, including advertisements and hiring a handful of people in sales, marketing, and software engineering, Acworth says.

“This is the first real amount of money [we’ve] put toward promoting what we do,” Acworth says.

Artaic, an alum of the MassChallenge Boston startup accelerator program, has raised a total of $3.1 million from investors to date, Acworth says. It has also received $5.8 million in grant funding from the National Science Foundation and other groups, he says.

Artaic will also make a sales push in Asia with the help of its new investors. Cambridge, MA-based InTeahouse is a global firm that runs a $30 million venture fund, a startup accelerator, events, and other programs geared toward entrepreneurs. InTeahouse was started two years ago by entrepreneur and investor Xin Liu, a China native, and the firm has offices in China. Acworth was part of a group of executives from 11 New England robotics firms that traveled to China on a 2016 trade mission organized by InTeahouse and MassRobotics, a Massachusetts nonprofit industry group.

Lesso, meanwhile, is a publicly traded China-based company whose global businesses primarily sell a variety of home building materials and services.

With Artaic, “I think Lesso saw an interesting product that they could sell in China,” Acworth says, noting that no such deals have been made yet. “They’re kind of known as the Ikea or Home Depot of China.”

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